Ian Hendry + Britt Ekland - ABC TV Armchair Theatre 'A Cold Peace' (1965)

Peter Sellers, Britt Ekland and Her First British TV Performance

In November 1963, Peter Sellers began filming A Shot in the Dark - a comedy film directed by Blake Edwards - and the second installment in The Pink Panther series.

In the film, Sellers plays Inspector Jacques Clouseau of the French Sûreté - an adaptation of a French play, L'Idiote by Marcel Achard.

Towards the end of filming - in early February 1964 - Peter Sellers saw a photograph in a newspaper of Britt Ekland, a Swedish actress, who had just arrived in London to film Guns at Batasi. Peter immediately began to figure out a way of meeting her. One possible reason for his immediate obsession is explained in the film The Life and Death Of Peter Sellers (2004), in which Maurice Woodruff is portrayed as playing an important part in Peter's pursuit of Britt Ekland.

Maurice Woodruff (2 April 1916 – 28 January 1973) was an English clairvoyant and astrologer, born and raised in London. He achieved considerable fame both in his native England and internationally due to the perceived accuracy of his predictions. He presented his predictions to the public via newspapers and also via stage, cabaret and television appearances. His mother was the clairvoyant Vera "Woody" Woodruff.

He had a considerable number of private clients including several well-known celebrities. One of his most famous clients was the actor Peter Sellers, who was apparently reluctant to make any major career or life decisions without a consultation.

In one scene in the film, Maurice is seen suggesting that the initials B.E. will be very important in Peter's life. It was meant as a prompt for Peter to pursue his career further with director Blake Edwards - but Peter mistook the initials as meaning Britt Ekland when he saw her photograph in the newspaper! Whether this is true or not is uncertain, but it is not difficult to imagine Sellers taking such advice and making it fit his own narrative!

On 19 February 1964, just ten days after their first meeting, the couple married and Ekland became famous 'overnight'.

Britt-Ekland-Peter-Sellers 1964

Picture: Peter Sellers and Britt Ekland - Wedding Day 1964

A Cold Peace - Ian Hendry, Britt Ekland and Peter Sellers

Sellers soon showed signs of insecurity and paranoia; he would become highly anxious and jealous, for example, when Ekland starred opposite attractive men. A classic example of this was during the filming of A Cold Peace, which was Ekland's first performance on British TV. In some scenes with Ian Hendry, Britt was required to wear bikinis and also appear in bed with him (see picture below) - something which proved too much at times for the jealous and possessive Sellers watching in the wings! Gabriel Hershman paints a vivid and humorous picture of the filming in his biography.

A Cold Peace

Ian Hendry plays Richard Bligh, a middle-aged journalist who escapes his problems in London for some debauchery in the South of France. There he meets Karen (played by Britt Ekland) and an affair begins.

The play is written by Robert Muller, who also wrote An Afternoon Of A Nymph - Ian's first ABC TV Armchair Theatre play.

See: An Afternoon Of A Nymph

Britt Ekland Armchair Theatre A Cold Peace 1965

Picture: Britt Ekland - portrait for ABC TV's Armchair Theatre 'A Cold Peace' (1965)

Ian Hendry A Britt Ekland Cold Peace Armchair Theatre 1965

Picture: Ian Hendry and Britt Ekland - In bed on set for for ABC TV's Armchair Theatre 'A Cold Peace' (1965)

Ian Hendry Roy Dotrice Britt Ekland A Cold Peace Armchair Thaetre 1965

Picture: Ian Hendry, Britt Ekland and Roy Dotrice - on set for for ABC TV's Armchair Theatre 'A Cold Peace' (1965)

Ian Hendry A Cold Peace Armchair Theatre1965

Picture: Ian Hendry - portrait for for ABC TV's Armchair Theatre 'A Cold Peace' (1965)

The two black and white stills below used to belong to wardrobe/ costume designer who worked for ABC TV. Years later she met my sister whilst they both were working for BBC Televison, and when she found out that she was Ian's niece she kindly gave them to her as a present.

Ian Hendry_Britt Ekland_A Cold Peace (1965)

Ian Hendry_Britt Ekland_A Cold Peace (1965)

Pictures: Ian Hendry and Britt Ekland- stills for for ABC TV's Armchair Theatre 'A Cold Peace' (1965).

ABC_ArmchairTheatre_1965_12_18_A ColdPeace_BrittEkland_TVTimes-Cover

Picture: Britt Ekland - TV Times Cover 18th December 1965

Cast

Ian Hendry ... Richard Bligh
Britt Ekland ... Karen
Roy Dotrice ... Donald Timwood
Isabel Dean ... Gwen Timwood
David Phethean ... Kirby
Kathleen Breck ... Marina

Crew

Directed by
Don Leaver

Writing credits
Robert Muller writer

Produced by
Leonard White .... producer

Production Design by
Patrick Downing

Music Department
Robert Farnon .... composer: theme music "Proscenium" (uncredited)

Other crew
Norman Bogner .... script editor

Best wishes

Neil Hendry
Editor, Official Website of Ian Hendry

Further Reading

A detailed account of the life and work of Ian Hendry in the new biography:

Read:  'Send in the Clowns - The Yo Yo Life Of Ian Hendry' by Gabriel Hershman

Send In The Clowns - The Yo Yo Life of Ian Hendry


Still Photographs From The Informer (1966-1967)

The Informer is a British drama series that starred Ian Hendry as Alex Lambert - a former barrister. It was broadcast in two series in 1966 and 1967.

Plot

A former barrister who had been disgraced and disbarred has to rebuild his life. He uses his former contacts on both sides of the law to become a paid informer for the Police. Living well from the rewards paid by insurance companies, Lambert still has to hide his activities from both his wife and others behind a new persona in the guise of a business consultant.

See: The Informer - Episode List

Sir Ridley Scott on The Informer

In a recent interview given Sir Ridley Scott - who directed several of the episodes as he navigated his early directing career - he described it as a 'very good show; and Ian as a 'spectacular' actor (see recording below).

He actually says The Insider in the interview, but it was back in the 60’s!

Missing Episodes

It's very frustrating then that of the 26 episodes made, only 2 are known to still exist - located in the vaults of the BFI. These can, however, be viewed by special arrangement:

See: Search: BFI Collections

The reason why so few episodes have survived seems inextricably linked to the time when Rediffusion was forced to merge with ABC Television to form Thames Televison in 1968. Most of their archived material was destroyed - depriving us of a large part of our television history.

Stills From The Series

However, we have located some great colour stills which gives us a small taste of the character and style of the show.

Ian Hendry The Informer 1966 #4a

Ian Hendry The Informer 1966 #1a

Ian Hendry The Informer 1966 #2a

Pictures: Ian Hendry - The Informer (1966)

26th May 1967. A portrait of the British actor Ian Hendry pictured playing his part with the British actress Jean Marsh during the making of film "Your money or your life", as he light her cigarette.

26th May 1967. A portrait of the British actor Ian Hendry pictured playing his part with the British actress Jean Marsh during the making of film "Your money or your life".

Ian Hendry Jean Marsh The Informer 1966 #3a

Pictures: Ian Hendry and Jean Marsh - The Informer (1966)

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ian hendry The Informer 1966

Pictures: Ian Hendry - The Informer (1966)

Ian Hendry The Informer 1966-1967

The Informer_Neil Hallett Ian Hendry 1966

Pictures: Ian Hendry and Neil Hallett -The Informer (1966)

TV Times Cover - The Informer

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Picture: Ian Hendry - Cover of The TV Times - The Informer (30th July 1966).

The Viewer Cover - The Informer

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Picture: Ian Hendry - Cover of The Viewer - The Informer (31st July 1966).

Camera Script Cover

The Informer Camera Script Keep Off The Grass 1966 Ian Hendry

Picture: Camera Script Cover 'Keep Off The Grass' - The Informer (1966). With thanks to Alan Hayes.

We'll keep The Informer on our radar and keep you updated on any more memorabilia that emerges. Hopefully other episodes of the show will also appear in time from private collections.

Best wishes

Neil Hendry
Editor, Official Website of Ian Hendry

Further Reading

A detailed account of the life and work of Ian Hendry in the new biography:

Read:  'Send in the Clowns - The Yo Yo Life Of Ian Hendry' by Gabriel Hershman

Send In The Clowns - The Yo Yo Life of Ian Hendry


Rare Still - Los Traidores de San Angel aka Traitors of San Angel (1967)

Picture above: Ian Hendry (as Nick Thomas) and Ray Millan (as Carlitos) - Los Traidores de San Angel aka Traitors of San Angel (1967)

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It's not clear how Ian Hendry became involved in this rather obscure film set in Argentina and the USA. It's almost certainly the only time in his career that he can be seen dressed up as a Catholic Priest!

The film was originally in technicolour but the only complete version found to date is in black and white.

Watch: Traitors of San Angel (1967)

In a recent comment on the video, the original principal screenwriter give us some more background to the original film.

James Lewis writes:

"As the principal screenwriter of this film I am appalled that it has been converted from beautiful technicolor to B and W. The color was very important for Leopoldo: he imbued it with dramatic significance. The film now is very dark and obscure when it was originally throbbing with color, light and velvety shadows."

Plot

Henchmen of the dictator from an unnamed South American country blackmail Nick Thomas (Ian Hendry) into being a government spy.

The former smuggler is to pose as a priest and enter a monastery thought to be sympathetic with rebel guerillas. For his compliancy, Nick is supposed to receive money and his freedom. Marina (Graciela Borges) poses as a prostitute in hopes of being thrown in jail to contact political prisoners.

Maurice Evans plays Father James Keefe, suspected of being a rebel conspirator. Enrique Sandoval is sufficiently sinister as the corrupt police chief who follows the orders of the ruthless dictator. The release of the film coincided with real-life events, as Catholic priests continued to be the victims of government persecution throughout Latin America

Direction

The film was directed by Leopoldo Torre Nilsson (5 May 1924 – 8 September 1978), also known as Leo Towers and as Babsy. Leopoldo was an Argentine film director, producer and screenwriter.

Born as Leopoldo Torres Nilsson (he later changed his paternal surname from Torres to Torre) was the son of Argentine pioneer film director Leopoldo Torres Ríos, with whom he collaborated between 1939 and 1949. He debuted in 1947 with the short El muro. His mother was an Argentinian citizen of Swedish descent. His uncle was cinematographer Carlos Torres Ríos (1898–1956)

See: Leopoldo Torre Nilsson

Credits

Directed by:

Leopoldo Torre Nilsson

Writing Credits (in alphabetical order)

Edgardo Cozarinsky
André Du Rona (story)
Beatriz Guido
James Lewis
Leopoldo Torre Nilsson

Cast (in credits order)

Ian Hendry ... Nick Thomas
Lautaro Murúa ... Fonseca
Graciela Borges ... Marina
Maurice Evans ... James Keefe
Enrique Lucero ... Rodriguez
Esther Sandoval ... Dona Consuelo
José de San Antón ... Director Carcel
Héctor Pellegrini ... Voice of Maurice Evans
Sergio Renán ... Voice of Ian Hendry (I)

Produced by:
André Du Rona ... executive producer
Leopoldo Torre Nilsson ... producer

Music by:
Sergio Mihanovich

Cinematography by:
Alex Phillips

Film Editing by:
Jorge Gárate
Chuck Workman

Production Design by:
André Du Rona

Art Direction by:
Óscar Lagomarsino

Set Decoration by:
Óscar Lagomarsino

Production Management by:
Patricia Thomson

Sound Department by:
Miguel Babuini ... sound recordist
José Feijóo ... sound editor

Editorial Department by:
Jorge Mobaied ... assistant editor
Óscar López Ruiz ... musical director

Best wishes

Neil Hendry
Editor, Official Website of Ian Hendry

Further Reading

A detailed account of the life and work of Ian Hendry in the new biography:

Read:  'Send in the Clowns - The Yo Yo Life Of Ian Hendry' by Gabriel Hershman

Send In The Clowns - The Yo Yo Life of Ian Hendry


Peter Bowles Anecdote - The Beaux' Stratagem Oxford Playhouse (1957)

Ian Hendry and Peter Bowles first worked together when they were both young actors starting out in repertory theatre.

The Beaux Stratagem Ian Hendry Oxford Playhouse 1957

Picture: Cast and Acts/ Scenes from the original programme - The Beaux' Stratagem, Oxford Playhouse (1957)

Their paths would cross again later, in the film Live Now Pay Later (1962) and The Informer (1966).

Peter was involved in a humorous moment with Ian when both were starring in The Beaux' Stratagem at the Oxford Playhouse in May 1957.

Michael Billington of The Guardian recalls:

"When Peter Bowles was playing The Beaux Stratagem in rep, his fellow actor Ian Hendry missed an entrance. "My companion is delayed," cried Bowles before rushing into the wings and going in frantic quest of the absent Hendry.

He returned just in time to see Hendry, by now desperately ad-libbing to cover Bowles's defection, rushing into the opposite wings to look for his fellow actor..."

Peter and Ian would go on to also work together on The Man Who Came To Dinner at the Oxford Playhouse in June 1957.

Delena Kidd, who studied with Ian at the Central School of Speech and Drama and a young Neil McCarthy - also in The Hill (1965) - appeared in both plays at Oxford.

The Man Who Came To Dinner Ian Hendry Oxford Playhouse 1957

The Man Who Came To Dinner Ian Hendry The Oxford Playhouse 1957 #2

Playing the archetypal English gent, with caddish moustache and dapper Savile Row suit, finally brought Peter Bowles to the notice of the viewing nation in 1979 after some twenty years toiling in repertory theatre and in countless supporting roles on television. Although a contemporary of Albert Finney, Alan Bates and Peter O'Toole at RADA, he remained outside the undefined theatrical club of his colleagues, whom he watched move swiftly on to stage and film success.

Throughout the 1960s Peter amassed a long line of smoothie villains and swarthy rogues in various ITV action dramas such as No Hiding Place (1959-67), Crane (1963-65), Public Eye (1965-75) and the cross-Atlantic series Danger Man (1960-61; 1964-66), The Saint (1962-69) and The Baron (1966-67). During this seemingly hectic yet thankless period, one of his more enjoyably manic roles turned up in the offbeat 'Escape in Time' episode (tx. 27/1/1967) for The Avengers (ITV, 1961-69) in which he gave a vigorous performance as an eyeball-rolling psychopath with over-heated designs on Diana Rigg.

The path from almost unknown supporting actor to household name may not have taken so long if, in 1975, he had not turned down the Paul Eddington role in The Good Life (BBC, 1975-77) in order to gain some artistic credibility by appearing on stage in Alan Ayckbourn's Absent Friends. Fortunately, by the end of the 1970s he was cast in the semi-regular role of the arch-smarmy Guthrie Featherstone QC in Rumpole of the Bailey (ITV, 1978-92).

It was during the 1979 run of Rumpole that he was offered the part of the oily nouveau riche Richard DeVere in To The Manor Born (BBC, 1979-81). The theatrical class snobbery sitcom, written by Peter Spence and intended originally as a radio series, seemed the ideal vehicle for the talents of Penelope Keith after her success in The Good Life. They made a perfect television comedy team and their characters' relationship, alternating between antagonism and affection, enthralled the nation. The series' finale attracted some 24 million viewers (See also: BFI - Peter Bowles )

Best wishes

Neil Hendry
Editor, Official Website of Ian Hendry

Further Reading

A detailed account of the life and work of Ian Hendry in the new biography:

Read:  'Send in the Clowns - The Yo Yo Life Of Ian Hendry' by Gabriel Hershman

Send In The Clowns - The Yo Yo Life of Ian Hendry


Ian Hendry + Janet Munro - Teddington Studios + Armchair Theatre's 'Afternoon Of A Nymph' (1962)

Recently I came across the wonderful TV Studio History website which gives a tremendous insight into the emergence of television and the background to production in the UK.

What caught my eye in particular was this fascinating picture taken at the studios in Teddington, London. It shows Ian Hendry rehearsing with Janet Munro for the ABC TV Armchair Theatre production 'An Afternoon Of A Nymph' which was first broadcast in November 1962.

Ian hendry Janet Munro Teddington Armchair Theatre Afternoon Of A Nymph

Picture: Ian Hendry and Janet Munro rehearsing for 'Afternoon of A Nymph' (1961)

ABC TV Armchair Theatre - 'Afternoon Of A Nymph'

Ian had his first big break in television with ABC TV in 1960 when he was cast as Dr. Geoffrey Brent in the TV series Police Surgeon. The series was short-lived (just 13 episodes) but Ian's star potential was noted and ABC TV were keen to find him a new 'vehicle' for his talent. After much creative 'brainstorming' the series created was of course The Avengers.

As part of the contract negotiations for The Avengers, Ian also agreed with ABC TV to star in two of their future Armchair Theatre plays - one of which was to be 'Afternoon Of A Nymph'.

Janet Munro had been a child star - appearing in several Disney films - and was the better known of the two at that point. But show business had always been part of her life - long before Disney came along. Her father was the Scottish comedian and actor, Alex Munro. Born in Glasgow, Alex later joined his brother Archie and sister June in an acrobatic act called The Star Trio. They later changed their name to The Horsburgh Brothers and Agnes and became part of Florrie Forde's music hall company with Flanagan and Allen.

During World War Two, Alex toured with the RAF show, Contact, and had his own BBC radio series The Size Of It. He headlined in a number of British variety theatres, before finally making his home in Llandudno, Wales. He was given creative control of the Llandudno Pier Pavilion Theatre in the 1970s. The Alex Munro Show ran at the Happy Valley in Llandudno for 30 years.

As Janet grew older she embarked on making the move from child star to more mature roles. Afternoon Of A Nymph represented a step in that transition along with films such as The Day The Earth Caught Fire (1961), Life for Ruth (1962) and Bitter Harvest (1963). When Ian met Janet on set he was still married to Jo, his first wife, but a turbulent romance began and the two fell in love - eventually marrying in 1963.

Afternoon Of A Nymph was written by Robert Muller, the second of seven plays he wrote for the Armchair Theatre series. He also created sinister stories for the TV series Supernatural (BBC, 1977). These included the two-part 'Countess Ilona' which starred Ian Hendry and Robert's wife of later years - actress Billie Whitelaw.

In 'Afternoon of A Nymph', Elaine (played by Janet Munro) is an anxious naive young actress with a fragile sense of self. An agent invites his young starlet to a party, to meet all the right people. A chance to move on from the commercials she has been doing, to bigger roles and maybe stardom. However while she is there, she realizes there is a price to pay. Peter Butterworth, William Gaunt, Patrick Holt and Aubrey Morris also starred in the production.

These TV plays were unique in many ways. The TV Studio History website describes why they were so special:

"Television dramas in the '60s and '70s attracted some of the most talented writers, directors and designers in the country. The 'television play' developed into an artform in its own right - neither theatre nor feature film it borrowed aspects from both but was appreciated by critics and viewers as a unique form of artistic endeavour. During the '80s it gradually died out and is sadly no longer with us."

The website also outlines the development of ABC TV's studios at Teddington on their History of TV Studios in London page:

"ABC TV did not have a London franchise but realising that most acting and showbiz talent was based in London they decided that they needed to have a London-based production centre with large studios to make their network shows. They converted some old film studios located in Teddington, on the western edge of London."

ABC purchased the studios and the site in 1958 and production of the first Armchair Theatre production began in 1959.

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Picture: Artistic drawing of the studios in 1931

A Brief History Of Filmmaking At Teddington

Film production on the site dates back to the early 20th century and the pioneering days of filmmaking. Originally an impressive mansion called Weir House stood on the site and its owner, wealthy stockbroker Henry Chinnery, took a keen interest in the early experiments in cinema and allowed filmmakers to use his greenhouse as a studio!

1912 - a company called Ec-Ko Films used the grounds of the house to make a series of low budget comedy and cowboy films. Ec-Ko stayed for three years before moving on to another studio in Kew.

1916 to 1929 - a new company - Master Films - took over in 1916. They built a 'dark' (i.e. not glass) stage in the grounds measuring some 60ft by 40ft. This was probably where studio 2 later stood. Master made many films but apparently they weren't up to much - apparently they suffered from several small fires due to using the new-fangled carbon arcs in the stage. Eventually it burnt down completely in 1929.

1931 - Teddington Film Studios was constructed by Henry Edwards and E G Norman. It is said that Edwards' wife Chrissy White was said to be the driving force behind this. She was an actress and very keen to be in the 'talkies' so persuaded her husband and his business partner to build her a studio.

1931 - Warner Bros take out a lease on the studios in the same year - later buying them outright - using them mostly to make 'quota quickies - British-made films which fulfilled a legal quota (created by the Cinematograph Films Act 1927) before American-made films could be shown.

The studios were renamed 'Warner Brothers First National Productions Ltd'.

Filming continued at the studios during the war, although the buildings suffering from severe bomb damaged.

The restored studios were re-opened by Danny Kaye in January 1948 - he was in the country to appear at the Palladium. But then the British film industry went into a period of decline which eventually led to:

November 1951 - Teddington went into 'care and maintenance.' Film-making ceased and during the next few years the site was used by the Hawker Aircraft Company, who had a factory just over the river in Ham, for storage.

Renaissance Of The Studios

With the film industry still in the doldrums, it was the emergence of television that led to the 'rebirth' of the studios.

TV Studio History gives us some background to ABC TV's acquisition of the studios:

"In November 1958 ABC Television bought the site and began the task of adapting the studios for TV use. Although ABC did not have a London franchise they still had to supply programmes to the ITV network. One of their most successful series was Armchair Theatre. This series was being transmitted live from Didsbury (Manchester) each Sunday night. The perils of live drama included actors forgetting lines and cameras breaking down. In fact, during one memorable performance of Armchair Theatre one of the actors was actually found dead in his dressing room just before transmission. The rest of the cast carried on like troupers and improvised his lines to keep the show going."

Ian Hendry Janet Munro Armchair Theatre Afternoon Of A Nymph Teddington Studio 2

Picture: Studio 2 Plan for Act 2 of 'Afternoon of a Nymph' (recorded in the autumn of 1961).

TV Studio History also describes the people and process involved:

"The designer was Assheton Gorton and it was directed by Philip Saville - a brilliantly talented man who was extremely demanding of all those who worked with him. Although the play was recorded, it was 'as live' since videotape was hardly ever edited in those days."

Assheton Gorton was also a key production designer on Get Carter (1971)

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Pictures: Screenshots from 'An Afternoon Of A Nymph'

Teddington Studios - After ABC TV

ABC TV was forced to merge with Rediffusion by the Independent Television Authority (ITA) and Thames Television was formed (in which ABC's parent company had a 51% stake), Teddington Studios became the main production centre for Thames's entertainment programming (e.g. gameshows, children's programmes, dramas and comedy), while documentary shows, news and sports programming were made at Thames's Euston Road headquarters.

After Thames lost its ITV franchise to Carlton Television, which took over in 1993, the studio became independent. Without a major broadcaster or studio group owning the studios, their future was questioned (as Carlton was going to commission most of its entertainment programming from independent producers), but it survived and stayed independent for 13 years, when in 2005, the Pinewood Studios Group bought the complex.

Pinewood Group's lease on Teddington Studios expired in 2014. The studios are due to be demolished and turned into housing, with many programmes currently made there moved to other facilities. The studio buildings will be replaced by three modern apartment blocks and other associated housing.

Alas, after a rich history of over 100 years of film and television production, the credits for the studios have rolled for the last time.

Best wishes

Neil Hendry
Editor, Official Website of Ian Hendry

Further Reading

A detailed account of the life and work of Ian Hendry in the new biography:

Read:  'Send in the Clowns - The Yo Yo Life Of Ian Hendry' by Gabriel Hershman

Send In The Clowns - The Yo Yo Life of Ian Hendry


Ian Hendry + June Ritchie - Original Lobby Cards - Live Now Pay Later (1962)

Video above: Open credits and the opening scene - Live Now Pay Later (1962)

___________________________________________________________________

These lobby cards (see below) were tracked down in the US and are the only ones that I have come across for Live Now Pay Later (1962) - Ian's first film in which he starred in the lead role.

Live Now Pay Later is comedy-drama by director Jay Lewis based on the novel and script by Jack Trevor Story, about an unscrupulous salesman, Albert Argyle (Ian Hendry), who is beset by a whole series of problems, all of his own making. In order to advance his career, Albert makes a habit of seducing his female customers to better convince them to buy beyond their means, on credit.

June Ritchie, with whom Ian would work with again two years later in This Is My Street (1964) and John Gregson co-starred.

At present the film is not available as a commercial release but it is available online from a number of sources that have produced DVD's of moderate quality from video recordings.

Ian Hendry June Ritchie Live Now Pay Later Lobby Card 1962 1

Ian Hendry June Ritchie Live Now Pay Later Lobby Card 1962 2

Ian Hendry June Ritchie Live Now Pay Later Lobby Card 1962 3

Ian Hendry June Ritchie Live Now Pay Later Lobby Card 1962 4

Ian Hendry June Ritchie Live Now Pay Later Lobby Card 1962 5

Ian Hendry June Ritchie Live Now Pay Later Lobby Card 1962 10

Ian Hendry June Ritchie Live Now Pay Later Lobby Card 1962

Ian-Hendry-Live-Now-Pay-Later-Still-Autograph-1

Picture: Original promotional photograph for Live Now Pay Later, signed by Ian Hendry

Ian Hendry Autograph Live Now Pay Later 1962

Picture: Original still photograph from Live Now Pay later, signed by Ian Hendry

Live Now Pay Later (1962)

Picture: Film poster for Live Now Pay Later (1962)

Ian Hendry Live Now Pay Later 1962 Press Promotion

Picture: Newspaper promotional advert for Live Now Pay later (1962)

Best wishes

Neil Hendry
Editor, Official Website of Ian Hendry

Further Reading

A detailed account of the life and work of Ian Hendry in the new biography:

Read:  'Send in the Clowns - The Yo Yo Life Of Ian Hendry' by Gabriel Hershman

Send In The Clowns - The Yo Yo Life of Ian Hendry


Ian Hendry + Orson Welles - Rare Original Still Photograph - The Southern Star (1969)

Recent discovery of a rare film still from the Southern Star (1969). Ian Hendry with Orson Welles - a hulk of a figure!

Ian Hendry Orson Welles Southern Star 1969

Picture: Ian Hendry with Orson Welles. Rare original still photograph for The Southern Star (1969)

The Southern Star is a 1969 British-French comedy crime film directed by Sidney Hayers and starring George Segal, Ursula Andress, Orson Welles, Ian Hendry and Harry Andrews.

In French West Africa in 1912, an extremely valuable diamond is stolen. It was based on the novel The Vanished Diamond (French title L'Étoile du sud) by Jules Verne. The film's opening scenes were anonymously directed by Orson Welles - the last time he would direct scenes in another director's film.

Ian Hendry_Southern Star (1969)

Picture: Ian Hendry. A slightly worn, rare still from the film.

etoile-du-sud-southern star-ian hendry-ursulla andress harry andrewsg

Picture: Ursula Andress and Harry Andrews with Ian Hendry watching on.

Ian Hendry The Southern Star 1969

Picture: Ian Hendry in The Southern Star (1969)

Ian Hendry The Southern Star 1969

Picture: Ian Hendry in The Southern Star (1969)

Southern Star Poster

Picture: Southern Star film poster for general release

Southern Star - Polish Poster by Andrzej Bertrandt

Picture: Striking Polish version of the film poster by Andrzej Bertrandt

Neil Hendry
Editor, Official Website of Ian Hendry

Further Reading

A detailed account of the life and work of Ian Hendry in the new biography:

Read:  'Send in the Clowns - The Yo Yo Life Of Ian Hendry' by Gabriel Hershman

Send In The Clowns - The Yo Yo Life of Ian Hendry